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Unique medical imaging framework

Researchers are developing a unique medical image processing framework aimed at helping oncologists treat lung cancer tumours more effectively.

COVID-19 not characterised by a cytokine storm

Inflammatory proteins known as cytokines play a crucial role in the immune response. If this response is too strong – a phenomenon known as “cytokine storm” – it can cause harm to the patient.

"Genome sequencing accelerates cancer detection"

A statistical model has been developed that uses genomic data to accurately predict whether a patient with Barrett’s oesophagus has a high or low risk of developing cancer.

Uncovering order in cancer's chromosomal chaos

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and the UCL Cancer Institute have identified how different cancers go through some of the same genetic mutations at the same point in their evolution.

Patient zero discovered?

A person on a poorly ventilated Chinese bus infected nearly two dozen other passengers with coronavirus and may be patient zero, it is claimed.

HSST programme: enhanced flexibility

The IBMS and a range of other bodies have announced changes that enhance the flexibility of training for senior healthcare scientists.

IBMS comment of replacing PHE

The IBMS has issued a comment in response to the government’s announcement that it is replacing Public Health England (PHE) and transferring some functions to the newly established National Institute for Health Protection.

The Biomedical Scientist Live

A live four-day digital event has been announced, which is free for all IBMS members to attend.

COVID 19: "More T cell data needed"

While early research on the adaptive immune response to COVID-19 primarily looked at antibodies, more information is now emerging on how T cells react to the SARS-CoV-2 virus – addressing a crucial knowledge gap.

"Three times risk for frontline healthcare workers"

Frontline healthcare workers with adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) have a three-fold increased risk of a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, compared with the public.

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