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Visual memory and science careers

People with low or no visual imagery are more likely to work in scientific and mathematical industries than creative sectors, according to new research.

The microbe that stops malaria

Scientists have discovered a microbe that completely protects mosquitoes from being infected with malaria.

Improving drug delivery

A group of US scientists has developed a new way to deliver molecules that target specific genes within cells.

Under the microscope: The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor

Tell me about this receptor
The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (let’s call it the GPER) is a seven-transmembrane-domain receptor that mediates non-genomic estrogen-related signalling.

Glucose-sensing neurons regulate blood sugar

Low blood sugar levels, known as hypoglycaemia, can be a life-threatening situation, especially for people with type 1 diabetes who rely on intensive insulin therapy to prevent blood sugar from going too high.

Immune responses to COVID-19

Most newly discharged patients who recently recovered from COVID-19 produce virus-specific antibodies and T cells, suggests a new study.

Lab-quality microscope for £15

For the first time, labs around the world can 3D print their own precision microscopes to analyse samples and detect diseases, thanks to an open-source design created at the University of Bath.

More effective stem cell transplant

Scientists have developed a new way to make blood stem cells present in the umbilical cord “more transplantable”.

"AI research could pose risk for patients"

Many studies claiming that artificial intelligence (AI) is as good as, or better than, human experts at interpreting medical images are of poor quality and potentially exaggerated.

"Disasters lead to reductions in cancer screening"

Cervical cancer screening rates in Japan were significantly affected in the years following the devastating Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011.

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