Histopathology

Frozen testicular tissue still viable after two decades

Male testis tissue that is cryopreserved can be reimplanted after more than 20 years and will make viable sperm, according to a new study in rodents.

AI can predict Crohn’s disease recurring after surgery

Using an artificial intelligence (AI) tool that emulates how humans visualise and is trained to recognise and classify images, investigators constructed a model that predicts the postoperative recurrence of Crohn’s disease with high accuracy by evaluating histological images.

Optical biopsy system for liver cancer

Researchers have developed an optical biopsy system that can distinguish between cancerous and healthy liver tissue.

Making the transition

Leah Riley, Histology Manager at Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, explains why and how her team ditched paper and the issues they overcame on their journey to a greener laboratory.

Label-free histopathology

A research team has developed a machine learning-based label-free histopathology device that can perform histopathology in real time.

“No urgent referral for 60% of red flags”

Six out of 10 patients in England with “red flag” symptoms indicative of possible cancer didn’t receive an urgent referral for specialist assessment within two weeks, as recommended in clinical guidelines.

The British Journal of Biomedical Science: Issue 4, 2021, synopsis

Editor Anthony Rhodes provides a brief glimpse of the articles on offer in the fourth issue of 2021.

Digital Pathology group

The IBMS discussion group for digital pathology is looking for new members to attend and facilitate at virtual meetings.

The British Journal of Biomedical Science: Issue 2 2021, Synopsis

Deputy Editor Guy Orchard provides a brief glimpse of the articles on offer in the second issue of 2021.

3D skin imaging

A portable device has been developed that produces high-resolution 3D images of human skin within 
10 minutes.

Medical eponmys pt4: Hodgkin disease

This is the fourth is a series of short biographies of persons whose names are directly used for diseases, conditions or syndromes familiar to those in clinical pathology labs. Their names are most often used because they made highly significant contributions to the discovery and understanding of the disease. 

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