Science

British Journal of Biomedical Science: Issue 4 2020 synopsis

Deputy Editor Nigel Brown provides a brief glimpse of the articles on offer in the fourth issue of 2020.

One-to-one: Navigating a galaxy of data

Following on from the publication of a new National Genomic Healthcare Strategy, we talk to Chris Wigley, Chief Executive of Genomics England.

Patient-centred care: decentralised testing and diagnostics

Lead Biomedical Scientist Tony Cambridge states that decentralised testing and diagnostics are vital for the future of the health service.

Case study: The hook effect in serum free ligh chain assay

Madihah Abbas, Specialist Biochemistry Team Manager at the Christie Pathology Partnership in Manchester, presents a case study.

Laboratory placements: alternatives and non-traditional practice

What placements are available and how can these be used to increase training capacity, as well as increase visibility and development of our profession? Lee Peters, Senior Biomedical scientist at Swansea University Health Board, looks at the issues.

Medical eponyms pt 3: Guido Fanconi

This is the third of a series of selected short biographies of persons whose names are directly used for diseases, conditions, syndromes or tests familiar to those working in clinical pathology laboratories.
 

Retrograde ejaculation (a proposed accreditation method)

David Sanders and colleagues discuss laboratory assessment of samples for retrograde ejaculation and outline how accreditation could work.

Medical eponyms (part 2): Aloysius Alzheimer

This is the second of selected short biographies of persons whose names are directly used for diseases, conditions, syndromes or tests familiar to those working in clinical pathology laboratories.

The great big biomedical lockdown quiz (part 3)

The third instalment of our biomedical science quiz. This time, we have a picture round and eight questions relating to ultrastructure, compiled by Catherine Griffiths, an Electron Microscopist from the Biomedical Imaging Unit at University Hospital Southampton.

Triad of molecules for COVID-19

Professor of immunobiology Adrian Hayday explains how three molecules could be used to predict deterioration in patients with COVID-19.

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