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Blood cancer trial participants

People aged 75 years and older are under-represented in blood cancer clinical trials, according to a comprehensive analysis of clinical trial.

Blood transfusion

Researchers from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found significant gaps in participation among those aged 75 and older, when considered against the incidence of these malignancies in this age group.

The research was presented at the 59th American Society of Haematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta in December.

The researchers found that, by comparison, adults under 65 years tend to be overly represented, despite the fact that a majority of blood cancers are most frequently diagnosed in those over 65 years of age.

Lead study author Bindu Kanapuru said: “Until now, there has been very little information about the enrolment of adults with haematologic cancers. Based on our findings, the occurrence of cancer is much higher in adults over 75 years of age compared with the proportion of patients in this age group who enrol in clinical trials.

“With so few patients aged 75 or older enrolled in clinical trials, critical information on the safety and effectiveness of new therapies in this age group is greatly lacking.”

Picture credit | iStock

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