News

AddToAny

Google+ Facebook Twitter Twitter

How blood cancer "recharges"

A new study has uncovered how blood cancer “steals” parts of surrounding healthy bone marrow cells in order to thrive.

The researchers found healthy bone marrow stromal cells were made to transfer their power-generating mitochondria to neighbouring cancer cells, effectively “recharging” the acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and supporting the leukaemia to grow.

AML has been found to act in a parasitic way by first generating oxygen-deprived conditions in the bone marrow, which then stimulates the transfer of healthy mitochondria from the non-cancerous cells to the leukaemia cells.

The study, published in Blood, also identified how and why the mitochondria are transferred and discusses the potential impact this could have on future treatment and study of cancer.

Study author Stuart Rushworth said: “Our results provide a first in the study of cancer mitochondrial transfer mechanism. We have clearly shown that the cancer cell itself drives transfer by increasing oxidative stress in the neighbouring non-malignant donor cells.”

bit.ly/BS_NovNews3

Related Articles

Books and mortarboard icon

Scholarship now open for entries

IBMS members are being encouraged to apply for the Carol Briggs-Smalley Scholarship.

Routes to membership

Registration as a Clinical Scientist

Alan Wainwright, IBMS Executive Head of Education, explains why the Institute has launched a new experiential route to registration as a Clinical Scientist.

Alison Geddis

Meet the President

New IBMS President Alison Geddis discusses pride in her profession, belief in the work of the IBMS and desire to see biomedical scientists recognised for the vital role they play.

Children in labs

"We see people, not blood tubes"

Malcolm Robinson, co-founder of Harvey’s Gang, tells how allowing children into pathology labs is transforming their healthcare experiences – and those of the staff who meet them.

Top