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Blood glucose and type 1 diabetes

A study shows that a gene therapy approach can lead to long-term survival for functional beta cells, as well as normal blood glucose levels for an extended period of time in mice with type 1 diabetes. 

Beta cells strand

The researchers used an adeno-associated viral vector to deliver to the mouse pancreas two proteins, which reprogrammed plentiful alpha cells into functional, insulin-producing beta cells.

Senior study author George Gittes, said: “This study is essentially the first description of a clinically translatable, simple single intervention in autoimmune diabetes that leads to normal blood sugars, and importantly with no immunosuppression.

“A clinical trial in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics in the immediate foreseeable future is quite realistic, given the impressive nature of the reversal of the diabetes, along with the feasibility in patients to do AAV gene therapy.”

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