Molecular Pathology & Genomics

One fat cell subtype responds to insulin stimulation

Scientists have discovered that there are three different subtypes of mature fat cells in white adipose tissue and that it is only one of these – AdipoPLIN – that responds to insulin.

Urine test to detect brain tumours

MicroRNAs in urine could be a promising biomarker to diagnose brain tumours and regular urine tests could help early detection and treatment, it is claimed.

Diagnose crohn’s with an engineered organism

Researchers have engineered a bacterium with the necessary capabilities for diagnosing a human disease.

Genomic medicine: Coming to the clinic near you?

Dr Rameen Shakur takes a look at how biomedical science and genomics are playing a part in real-world clinical cardiology.

Unintended consequences

Computational biologist Gregorio Alanis- Lobato highlights the need for greater awareness of and further research into the effects of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing.

The evolution of quality assessment

In 2011, UK NEQAS Cellular Pathology Technique (CPT) carried out tests across four schemes – it now covers 12 schemes with two in the pipeline. We hear from Chantell Hodgson, UK NEQAS CPT Scheme Manager.

Blurring boundaries: Ethics and artificial intelligence

With artificial intelligence becoming ever more prominent in biomedical labs and research, biomedical scientist turned ethicist Sarah E Carter looks at the pressing issues.

Genetic risk factor for stroke

Researchers have identified a common genetic variant as a risk factor for stroke – especially in patients older than 65.

Precision genomics in cancer treatments

Scientists have identified genomic signatures in women developing the most common type of breast cancer that can be associated with long-term survival.

Diagnosis of Liposarcomas

Researchers have leveraged the latest advances in RNA technology and machine learning methods to develop a gene panel test that allows for highly accurate diagnosis of the most common types of liposarcoma.

Prostate cancer genetics study shows disparities

Risk of prostate cancer is about 75% higher, and more than twice as deadly, in men of African ancestry compared with men of European ancestry.

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