Immunology

Helpful and harmful gut immune cells

A type of immune cell that contributes to inflammatory bowel disease exists in two forms – “good” and “bad”.

New barometer for inflammatory disease

A unique discovery about the nature of neutrophils may lead to new models for diagnosing and tracking inflammatory diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. 

What’s in a name?

The role of the biomedical scientist has evolved, but more work is needed to change public awareness.

Autoimmunity symposium

To celebrate the launch of the Zenit PRO, Menarini Diagnostics hosted an Autoimmunity symposium. This was attended by scientific staff from across the country despite very challenging weather conditions. The following is an account by Ms Amani Elhouderi of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust; reflecting on the day’s events.

Fungus might play role in Crohn’s disease

A fungus commonly found in human hair follicles also resides in the gut and might play a role in Crohn’s disease, it is reported.

April: News in numbers

A breakdown of science news this month, in numbers.

“US misinformation causes epidemic”

The US reported more measles cases in the first two months of this year than in all of 2017, with public health officials blaming “misinformation” for the growing epidemic.

The new dawn of immunotherapy

Steven Rosenberg made headlines around the globe for a breakthrough that could make immunotherapy a frontline cancer treatment.

Vaccine to treat lung cancer

A first-of-its-kind treatment vaccine has moved into a phase I clinical trial for patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

July: Journal-based learning

Each article’s contents should be read, researched and understood, and you should then come to a decision on each question. The pass mark is 17 out of 20 questions answered correctly. JBL exercises may be completed at any time until the published deadline date. Please select your choice of correct answers and complete the exercises online at: www.ibms.org/cpd/jbl

Could bacteriophages replace antibiotics?

A small-scale preliminary trial concludes that bacteriophages could be a viable replacement for antibiotics in the future.

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