Immunology

Autoimmunity symposium

To celebrate the launch of the Zenit PRO, Menarini Diagnostics hosted an Autoimmunity symposium. This was attended by scientific staff from across the country despite very challenging weather conditions. The following is an account by Ms Amani Elhouderi of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust; reflecting on the day’s events.

Modified flu virus that targets and kills cancer cells

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have received a grant from Prostate Cancer UK, as London continues to lead the way in advanced prostate cancer research.

Under the microscope: Streptomyces sp. myrophorea

This month: Streptomyces sp. myrophorea

Journal-based learning exercises

Each article’s contents should be read, researched and understood, and you should then come to a decision on each question. The pass mark is 17 out of 20 questions answered correctly. JBL exercises may be completed at any time until the published deadline date. Please select your choice of correct answers and complete the exercises online at: www.ibms.org/cpd/jbl

Reprogramming immune sentinels

In a world first, a research team has successfully reprogrammed mouse and human skin cells into immune cells called dendritic cells.

Bacteria’s sleeper cells

New research, from scientists at Imperial College London, unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells.

Cutting-edge research pt.1

The IBMS has awarded five research grants this year. Here, the first two successful candidates outline the work they are undertaking.

Could bacteriophages replace antibiotics?

A small-scale preliminary trial concludes that bacteriophages could be a viable replacement for antibiotics in the future.

Antibiotic resistance and microwaves

Lecturer in Molecular Microbiology Tina Joshi looks at the detection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in the timeframe of a doctor’s appointment.

New delivery method for immunotherapy combination

Using nanoparticles to bind molecules that can unleash and stimulate immune cells, US researchers found they could more effectively trigger the body’s defence systems against cancer in laboratory studies.

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