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Public urged to take heart age test

Public Health England (PHE) is calling for adults across the country to take a free, online Heart Age Test, which will provide an immediate estimation of their “heart age”.

If someone’s heart age is higher than their actual age, they are at an increased risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

24,000 CVD deaths in people under 75, 80% of which are preventable if people make lifestyle and behaviour changes to improve heart health.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), with stroke and heart attack being the most common examples, is the leading cause of death for men and the second leading cause of death for women.

A quarter (24,000) of CVD deaths are in people under the age of 75, with 80% of these preventable, if people made lifestyle and behaviour changes to improve their heart health.

Knowing their heart age helps people to find out whether they are at risk and consider what they can do to reduce this risk.

Matt Kearney, National Clinical Director for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at NHS England, said: “The heart age test is a simple and effective online device with the potential to help millions of people.

“The long-term plan for the NHS will prioritise saving lives through improved protection against cardiovascular disease, and increased public understanding of the risks of stroke and heart disease will mean fewer people have to face these devastating conditions.”

 

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