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Gastrointestinal tumour recurrence

US researchers have identified a new feature indicative of the chance of recurrence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs).

Clinicians currently rely on examining the prognostic features of location, size and mitotic activity.

But researchers have now identified mucosal ulcerations as a potential fourth feature that could play a role in indicating the chance of recurrence.

“Our findings indicate that ulceration is an independent predictor of the three known features experts use in risk stratification of GISTs,” said Martin McCarter, lead author. “This finding is significant because it’s new information that might change the future of treatment of this tumour.”

The team examined a database of patients diagnosed with GISTs and completed a chart review to determine the occurrence rate of ulcerations in addition to the other pathological indicators.

Of 310 patients reviewed, 85 had mucosal ulceration with their GIST. Researchers found that patients with ulcerated GIST were more likely to experience disease progression.

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