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Diagnosing prostate cancer

Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbour higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, according to new research.

The study is the first to report that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some low-risk cases.

The study found the needle biopsy procedure may miss higher-risk cancer that increases the risk of disease progression. The researchers said that men diagnosed with low-risk cancer may benefit from additional testing for these chromosomal alterations.

George Vasmatzis, lead researcher, said: “We have discovered molecular markers that can help guide men in their decisions about the course of their prostate cancer care.

“We found that the presence of genetic alterations in low-risk cancer can help men decide whether treatment or active surveillance is right for them.”

Picture credit | iStock

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