News

AddToAny

Google+ Facebook Twitter Twitter

Breast Cancer: Map holds hope for future

Scientists have created a “map” linking the shape of breast cancer cells to genes turned on and off, and matched it to real disease outcomes.

Breast cancer tissue: iStock

It is hoped that the map, which uses large sets of data to create a network of links between cell shape and genes, will one day help doctors select treatments.

The researchers analysed cell shape in millions of images of more than 300,000 breast cancer cells, and data for more than 28,000 different genes.

They found that cell shape changes, which can be caused by physical pressures on the tumour, are converted into changes in gene activity.

Using the maps to analyse thousands of samples, they discovered that these changes are linked to clinical outcomes for patients.

Professor Karen Vousden said: “The insights and approaches used in this research could one day lead to us being able to tell from appearance, how aggressive someone’s cancer is and how likely to spread, helping doctors decide the best course of treatment.”  

Related Articles

HOW WELL DO CANCER DRUGS HIT THEIR TARGETS?

Scientists have developed a technique that allows them to measure how well cancer drugs reach their targets in the body.

“CANCEROUS CELLS WORK TOGETHER TO INFILTRATE THE BRAIN”

Scientists have discovered that cancerous cells in an aggressive type of childhood brain tumour work together to infiltrate the brain.

MAGNETS ISOLATE CIRCULATING TUMOUR CELLS

Scientists claim that magnets could be used in the body to detect tumour cells that other diagnostic techniques might miss.

my ibms Microscopic of koilocyte cell criteria of hpv human papilloma virus infection pap smear shutterstock

HPV primary screening

Following a review of its delivery strategy, NHS England has agreed to begin a one-stage procurement process to reconfigure provider laboratories to support the roll-out of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) primary screening into the NHS Cervical Cancer Screening Programme in England.

Top