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Biomarker for bladder cancer

A new diagnostic technique has revealed a protein biomarker that accurately differentiates bladder cancer from benign inflammation.

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Label-free digital pathology using infrared imaging, with subsequent proteomic analysis, was used to discover the first protein biomarker (AHNAK2) for bladder cancer.

AHNAK2 differentiates between chronic cystitis (inflammation of the bladder) and a non-muscle invasive-type BC (carcinoma in situ), which is challenging to diagnose.

A new report describes this diagnostic procedure, which is label-free, automated, observer-independent, and as sensitive and specific as established histopathological methods.  

Image credit | Science Photo Library 

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