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Advances in DNA origami

New research describes a method allowing for the automation of DNA origami construction – accelerating and simplifying the process of crafting desired forms.

It is claimed that the advances may open the world of DNA architecture to a broader audience. In recent years DNA origami has enabled the construction of a rapidly growing menagerie of two- and three-dimensional objects, with applications in biomedical and material science.

Lead author Hao Yan said: “DNA origami design has come to the time that we now can draw a form freely and ask the computer to output what is needed to build the target form.”

Yan and have created a fully-autonomous procedure to design all DNA staple sequences needed to fold any free-form 2D scaffolded DNA origami wireframe object. Their algorithm uses wireframe edges consisting of two parallel DNA duplexes and enables the full autonomy of scaffold routing and staple sequence design.

 

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