News

AddToAny

Google+ Facebook Twitter Twitter

Advances in DNA origami

New research describes a method allowing for the automation of DNA origami construction – accelerating and simplifying the process of crafting desired forms.

It is claimed that the advances may open the world of DNA architecture to a broader audience. In recent years DNA origami has enabled the construction of a rapidly growing menagerie of two- and three-dimensional objects, with applications in biomedical and material science.

Lead author Hao Yan said: “DNA origami design has come to the time that we now can draw a form freely and ask the computer to output what is needed to build the target form.”

Yan and have created a fully-autonomous procedure to design all DNA staple sequences needed to fold any free-form 2D scaffolded DNA origami wireframe object. Their algorithm uses wireframe edges consisting of two parallel DNA duplexes and enables the full autonomy of scaffold routing and staple sequence design.

 

Related Articles

HIV Shutterstock

Second person to be clear of HIV

A UK patient’s HIV has become “undetectable” following a stem cell transplant – in the second case of its kind.

“POCT benefits patients and cuts costs”

On-site pathology testing is allowing remote Australians to receive effective emergency medical treatment, while saving millions, according to researchers.

Detecting atrial fibrillation

Could routine screening for atrial fibrillation be in the pipeline? Jonathan Mant is leading the programme that he hopes will be the catalyst.

Hens that lay human proteins in eggs offer future therapy hope

Chickens that are genetically modified to produce human proteins in their eggs can offer a cost-effective method of producing certain types of drugs, research suggests.

Top