News

AddToAny

Google+ Facebook Twitter Twitter

“CANCEROUS CELLS WORK TOGETHER TO INFILTRATE THE BRAIN”

Scientists have discovered that cancerous cells in an aggressive type of childhood brain tumour work together to infiltrate the brain.

The researchers investigated a type of childhood brain tumour called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG).

They analysed its ability to leave the brain stem and send cancer cells to invade the rest of the brain.

DIPG is incredibly difficult to treat and nearly all children with this type of cancer die within two years.

The researchers used donations of biopsy tissue and the brains of children who had died as a consequence of DIPG.

They found that DIPGs are heterogenous, which enables the cells to “work” together to leave the original tumour and travel into the brain. The scientists say this shows a multi-pronged attack is likely to be necessary for treatment.

Professor Chris Jones, who led the study, said: “This is the first time we’ve observed this sort of interaction between different tumour cells in DIPG.

“The idea that the cells are working together to make the disease grow and become aggressive is new and surprising.”

Click here for the study.

Image credit | iStock

Related Articles

HOW WELL DO CANCER DRUGS HIT THEIR TARGETS?

Scientists have developed a technique that allows them to measure how well cancer drugs reach their targets in the body.

MAGNETS ISOLATE CIRCULATING TUMOUR CELLS

Scientists claim that magnets could be used in the body to detect tumour cells that other diagnostic techniques might miss.

my ibms Microscopic of koilocyte cell criteria of hpv human papilloma virus infection pap smear shutterstock

HPV primary screening

Following a review of its delivery strategy, NHS England has agreed to begin a one-stage procurement process to reconfigure provider laboratories to support the roll-out of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) primary screening into the NHS Cervical Cancer Screening Programme in England.

Dr. Alan Friedman Performs a Glioblastoma Biopsy at Duke University Hospital

Poliovirus therapy for recurrent glioblastoma

A genetically modified poliovirus therapy shows significantly improved long-term survival for patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

Top